KRISTY M CHAN
Slade School of Fine Art, University College London 
Artist Biography:
Kristy M Chan is a Hong-Kong born, London-based painter. Chan’s hologram-like work explores the notion of displacement, movement and change. Dense with information and odd depictions of her environment, Chan’s work reflects on her upbringing in Hong Kong and the experience of migration. It also explores the act of locating the notion of “home” and its relationship with its cultural geographies.
 
She has exhibited in the UK and internationally across Europe and Asia, including a future solo show in London with KOVET.ART and at the Monaco Art Fair 2021, represented by the Madrid-based Van Gogh Art Gallery. Her works are also represented in New York, Cyprus and Dubai. She has participated in several residencies in Finland, the UK and Germany, and soon and Chile, enhancing her fascination with migration and displacement. She was invited to interviews by online platforms and was selected to be in 10 online exhibitions since the March 2020. Her works are in various private collections in the UK, Italy, Germany, France, Cyprus, Hong Kong and America. She received a First-Class Honours Bachelor’s Degree from the Slade School of Fine Art in 2019, and Masters in Contemporary Art at the Sotheby’s Institute of Art, 2020.
Man Across the Window No. 2
Stop-motion and video
2020
This short film is about a neighbour who lived across me during my residency in Leipzig. It firstly came about as annoyance as he would speak loudly to passer-by at 7am everyday. It then became curiosity towards a strangers’ life as well as a neighbourly relationship. At some point I tried speaking to him but he only speaks German, yet, I’d still greet him whenever I see his head peeking out his window. The work aims to explore the idea of voyeurism and opens the discourse about the difference between me, a female “watching” a male neighbour through a female gaze, and how problematic it might be perceived in reverse if I were male and was watching a female neighbour. It also taps upon how we invade people's privacy on a daily basis.
Sotheby's Institute of Art